Staff

George Evano
Publisher

In a communications and marketing career spanning more than 30 years, George has directed record-setting sales campaigns for the Oregon Bach Festival, produced marketing materials that have won Telly, Summit, and International Graphics Competition awards, and led the communications team for the University of Oregon’s current fundraising campaign.  Following his own Oregon Trail, he grew up in New Jersey, attended college in West Virginia, adventured in New Mexico, and worked in the San Francisco area before answering the Duck call in 1993. He is currently the UO’s Director of Alumni and Development Communications.
gevano[at]uoregon[dot]edu

JoDee Stringham
Art Director

JoDee has loved magazines since she picked up her first copy of MAD. She has been art directing and designing them for more than 20 years, and loves working with talented writers, photographers and illustrators to create smart, lively pages. JoDee moved to the East Coast in the 1980s, and has worked for The New York Times Magazine, The Washington Post, Elektra Entertainment, and at her own design practice serving the publishing and music industries. She has a BFA from the School of Visual Arts in NYC. Prior to moving to Eugene to work for Oregon Quarterly, she spent six years in Portland, so yes, she CAN pickle that. 
jodees[at]uoregon[dot]edu

Shelly Cooper
Publishing Administrator

Shelly "Green Thumb" Cooper has been working behind the scenes at Oregon Quarterly since 1997, keeping the business end of the magazine chugging along. If you need to get a magazine or make a connection with OQ, you need to speak to Shelly. When not in the office you will find her spending time on her small farm gardening, tending her animals, canning, and baking. Spending time with family, friends, and grandchildren rounds out her hours off campus.
scooper[at]uoregon[dot]edu

 

Two talented math minds at UO tackle an abstract concept in "representation theory"

UO graduate student Hilarie Sorensen witnessed an emerging phenomenon along the Pacific Northwest coastline.

Early-warning systems give communities critical seconds or minutes before a quake hits
 

Meg Free