Ducks publish on an astounding range of topics, as the following titles illustrate.

small back bookmarks
The Small Backs of Children

(HarperCollins, 2015)
By Lidia Yuknavitch, BA ’89, PhD ’98

In a war-torn village in Eastern Europe, an American photographer captures a heart-stopping image: a young girl fleeing a fiery explosion that has engulfed her
home and family. A suicidal writer who has suffered her own devastating tragedy becomes obsessed with the photo, leading her husband and friends to try to save
her by rescuing the girl and bringing her to the United States. The novel explores the treacherous, often violent borders between war and sex, love and art.

 Landscapes of Change: Innovative Designs and Reinvented Sites
Landscapes of Change: Innovative Designs and Reinvented Sites

(Timber Press, 2014)
By Roxi Thoren

Climate change, natural resource use, population shifts, and many other factors have changed the demands we place on landscape designs. Using 25 case studies from around the world, Landscapes of Change examines how these challenges inspire new design strategies and result in innovative works that are redefining the field. Thoren is an associate professor in the UO’s Departments of Architecture and Landscape Architecture.

Morality bookmarks
Morality for Humans: Ethical Understanding from the Perspective of Cognitive Science

(University of Chicago Press, 2015)
By Mark Johnson

Mixing cognitive science with pragmatist philosophy, Johnson argues that appealing to absolute principles is not only scientifically unsound, but even morally suspect. This book shows how we can use ethical naturalism to adapt our moral standards to many different situations. Johnson is a Philip H. Knight Professor and a College of Arts and Sciences Distinguished Professor in the Department of Philosophy at the UO.

The Hunter bookmarks
The Hunter, The Stag, and the Mother of Animals: Image, Monument, and Landscape in Ancient North Asia

(Oxford University Press, 2015)
By Esther Jacobson-Tepfer

A professor emerita of art history analyzes stone mounds, altars, standing stones, and petroglyphs to reconstruct the prehistory of myth and belief in North Asia. Her narrative shows how images of hunters, mothers, and stags relate to a narrative of birth, death, and transformation in southern Siberia and Mongolia. 

Students in the Science & Memory program use multimedia storytelling techniques to turn the science of climate change into compelling narratives

A website called the Lyon Archive explores A.S. Lyon's life charted by students contributing to the digital archive

Sapeurs devote their lives to staying on the cutting edge of fashion